Tag Archives: Survive

8 Minutes of reflection

If we get to a job in 8 minutes and 1 second, and the patient survives, it is deemed a failure.

If we get to a job in 7 minutes 59 seconds, and the patient dies, it is deemed a success.

Just reflect on that for a moment….but not too long!

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ANOTHER public arrest.

Very much on the theme of my post last month, we were sent to another public cardiac arrest.

My crew mate, myself and a University Student on placement had just discharged a patient on scene; a baby who had diarrhoea the day before and her dad called 111. 111 had decided that this was immediately life threatening and actually passed the job to us a an ‘Unresponsive Baby’, which we were very glad to discover she was not.

I digress. We made ourselves available and immediately received details of an emergency in the city about 7 miles away. We were told that an elderly male had collapsed in the street and wasn’t breathing.  This is normally a 20 minute drive with traffic but I got there in 9.

We arrived to find a Rapid Response Vehicle (RRV) Paramedic doing chest compressions and one of our Officers who had also been dispatched, breathing for a patient with a Bag Valve Mask (BVM).

Between the three of us, we had already decided what our plan would be. My crew mate would jump out and help with advanced skills such as IV access or advanced airway management, the Student would take over chest compressions (because he is not allowed to perform any other skills yet, and it’s good experience to do so when the opportunity presents) and I would manage getting the patient off of the pavement and into the relative privacy of our ambulance.

I overheard that they had already delivered 2 defibrillator shocks prior to our arrival, and as I prepared our scoop stretcher, they delivered a third. Between myself and one other, we ‘scooped’ the man onto our stretcher and, while the student continued CPR, wheeled him into the ambulance.

There were Police on scene as well, who had been very proactive and closed the busy road. I was blocking it with my ambulance anyway. Sometimes that’s the only option.

A 4th shock was delivered in the back of the ambulance. For the 4th time, we had been unsuccessful in restarting his heart. But the battle continued.

We were informed that the Air Ambulance had landed in a nearby field and we were to drive round to meet them. I jumped in the front, and with the Police stopping traffic, made my way the half mile or so the the helicopter, where we were met by a Critical Care Doctor and a Critical Care Paramedic.

After a further 25 minutes of quick thinking and hard work, the man regained his pulse – something we call ROSC (Return Of Spontaneous Circulation), however, his heart rhythm was one which would not sustain life and another shock was given to ‘revert’ it back to a normal sinus rhythm. The Doctor, with agreement from all those involved, decided the ‘likely‘ cause – we never really know in these situations – was a Heart Attack which had caused the Cardiac Arrest. There is a specialist hospital that deals with this sort of emergency and it was decided that as the man was too unstable to fly, we would travel by road to this hospital in the next major city.

When everyone was ready, I began the 30 minute blue light drive. It’s a funny feeling up there in the cab on your own. You have a huge responsibility to deliver precious cargo there safely but quickly. The drive must be progressive but smooth. You need to look far into the distance to pick a route through traffic that will cause the least amount of movement in the back of the ambulance and have a 360 degree awareness. It is knackering!

30 minutes later, we arrived and I opened the back doors to lower the tail lift to unload the patient. I’m met by the Doctor who said “that was superb!” High praise indeed! I thanked him and continued to assist with unloading. The patient had maintained ROSC and was making respiratory effort but was unconscious and still very unwell.

We wheeled him in to the resus’ bay and the Doctor handed over to the lead hospital clinician where they set to work attaching leads, taking blood, checking the airway, listening to his chest, arranging scans and a host of other things.

We then were left with the mammoth job of clearing up.

He was alone shopping when he collapsed, but the Officer and I had found his wallet and ID so had his name and address, he also had his next of kin details which we passed to the Police.

I have no idea what happened to the man after we left, but I do hope he survived. If it was not to be, I hope his family were able to come and be by his side before he passed away. Either way, he had been given every chance of survival.

When reflecting on the job, I realised that was the first Cardiac Arrest I had attended where I had not done a single chest compression! Many hands and all that.

The following day, I attended an incident in Bath with my other Crew mate. I don’t like putting city names in my posts but this is important.

We were first on scene at a horrendous incident that made national news on the 9th February 2015 where 4 people were killed in a dreadful accident. I just want you to know that yes, I was there. Yes, it was horrific. And no, I will never be posting it on here.  My trust has been superb in supporting all ambulance staff involved and I have had lots of support from colleagues, friends and of course my beautiful fiancé.

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